Students may present their work in one of five formats:

  1. Poster Presentation
  2. Oral Presentation
  3. Artistic or Creative Presentation
  4. Musical Performance
  5. Film Presentation

Regardless of format, proposals should reflect the efforts of a single individual or a collaboration of up to 6 people.  The efforts of all who collaborated in a significant manner on the work to be presented must be listed as authors/artists.

All presentations must have a Georgia State University undergraduate student as the primary author and a Georgia State University faculty member as a sponsor. Students may submit only one project as a first author/artist.  Work presented at a previous GSURC cannot be presented a second time.

Prior to acceptance, the GSURC Advisory Board will review all proposals. Submission does not guarantee acceptance. We encourage students to work closely with faculty sponsors to submit their very best work.

Before you begin the proposal submission process, please be sure you have:

  • The submission’s title
  • The abstract (up to 350 words)
  • The electronic format of your file, or hyperlink to your file
  • Identified a Faculty Sponsor and discussed the implications of submitting your work to GSURC

Poster presentations are concise descriptions of a scientific study or other project.  Components of posters often include an introduction to the work, a research question, hypothesis, or statement of problem to be solved; a description of the method used; the results or finished product; and a discussion of the importance of the work to the field and/or society or a conclusion.

Guidelines for submitting your Poster Presentation 

The abstract for a poster presentation should include the following components: (1) the title of the work, (2) a list of all authors, (3) the name of the faculty sponsor, and (4) a brief description of the work. Descriptions of scientific studies should include the purpose of the study, the research question being addressed, a brief summary of the methods and results, and a statement of the overall conclusions and significance of the study. Abstracts for projects or works that are not scientific studies should include a brief description of the motivation behind the work, the medium or methods used, and a discussion of the work’s meaning or importance.

Instructions for Presenting your Poster 

The virtual poster session is designed to mirror an in-person poster session, with posters available for viewing throughout the conference and presenters available to answer questions and engage with conference participants during a specific one-hour time period. Each presenter should prepare a PDF file of their complete poster as well as a three- to five-minute elevator pitch style pre-recorded video, walking the audience through the basics of the poster presentation.

Both the poster file and the pre-recorded video should be uploaded to the conference site by Monday, April 12th so that attendees can read through the poster and watch the video in advance of the live poster session later in the week. The live poster session will be a one-hour video conference session during which judges and conference participants will be able to drop in and ask presenters more specific questions about their poster presentations. More detailed instructions and tutorials about how to upload the poster and supplementary materials will be provided well in advance of the conference. 

Sample Poster Submission 

Oral presentations are delivered orally and are based on a more fully developed paper or study. Oral presentations are not read from a paper, but provide a thorough synopsis of the work. Oral presentations are typically supplemented with PowerPoint or other audio-visuals, but these are not required. Each oral presentation will be allotted a 15-minute time slot. Presenters should plan to speak for approximately 10 minutes and reserve the remaining five minutes for questions from conference participants.

Guidelines for submitting your Oral Presentation 

The abstract for an oral presentation should include the following components: (1) the title of the work, (2) a list of all authors, (3) the name of the faculty sponsor and (4) a brief description of the work. Descriptions of scientific studies should include the purpose of the study, the research question being addressed, a brief summary of the methods and results, and a statement of the overall conclusions and significance of the study. Abstracts for projects or works that are not scientific studies should include a brief description of the motivation behind the work, the medium or methods used, and a discussion of the work’s meaning or importance.

Instructions for Delivering your Oral Presentation

Oral presentations will be delivered live during a one-hour video conference session. Each session will include up to four speakers presenting work from similar disciplines. Out of respect for all presenters, authors are required to attend the full one-hour session for which their presentation is scheduled. Each session will be managed by a student moderator who will introduce the presenters, monitor the timing of the presentations, and moderate questions from attendees.

Sample Oral Presentation Submission 

A range of methods to display artistic and creative projects is possible and we encourage artists to submit their work.

Guidelines for submitting your Artistic Display/Creative Works
Submit an abstract (up to 200 words) introducing the work, the problem or question asked by the work, research processes, medium used, and any conclusion drawn from the work from the artist's point of view. Include any information that will help a reviewer evaluate your proposal. If an Artistic Design submission, follow the format below:

Title of the work:
Name (Artist’s Name):
Program (Area of Study):
Student Contact (GSU email):
200 Words describing your work (Research Method/Statement):
Image of your work (at least 300 dpi): 
 

Instructions for Presenting your Artistic Display/Creative Works
The virtual artistic display session is designed to mirror an in-person session, with creative works available for viewing throughout the conference and presenters available to answer questions and engage with conference participants during a specific one-hour time period.

Each presenter should prepare an artist statement as well as a media file of their work (image, slide show or video file). The type of media file used to showcase the work is entirely up to the presenter. Both the statement and the media file should be uploaded to the conference site by Monday, April 12th so that attendees can view the work and read the statement in advance of the live session later in the week.

The live session will be a one-hour video conference session during which judges and conference participants will be able to drop in and ask presenters more specific questions about their work. More detailed instructions and tutorials about how to upload the files and supplementary materials will be provided well in advance of the conference.

Sample Artistic Display Submission 


Performance submissions will be evaluated on a case by case basis to determine the best method through which to showcase the presentation.
Guidelines for submitting your Musical Performances
Submit an abstract introducing the work (composer, instrumentation, context, performer(s), etc.) and the rationale for the submission of the work. In the case of performances of previously existing works, the abstract should clearly explain the performer(s)’ interpretive decisions including choice of repertoire, and their distinct creative impact on the listener’s perception of the work. For performers proposing a lecture-performance of an existing work, please include a recording of the work with the proposer(s) performing on the recording, as well as an outline of the proposed lecture. If you are submitting an original composition to be performed, include the impetus and rationale behind the creation of the work and also include a copy of the score with the submission.

Instructions for Presenting your Musical Performance

The virtual musical performance session will include both synchronous and asynchronous components, with recordings of the performance available for viewing throughout the conference and presenters available to answer questions and engage with conference participants during a specific one-hour time period.

Each presenter should provide a link to view their performance, as well as either a written or video introduction to their performance. These materials should be uploaded to the conference site by Monday, April 12th so that conference attendees and judges can view the introductory materials and watch the performance in advance of the live session later in the week.

The live session will be a one-hour video conference session during which judges and conference participants will be able to drop in and ask the presenter more specific questions about their work. More detailed instructions and tutorials about how to upload the files and supplementary materials will be provided well in advance of the conference.

Sample Performance Submission 

Guidelines for Submitting Your Film for Consideration in GSURC

Film and motion media-makers working in any genre are encouraged to submit a proposal.

Submit a brief abstract that provides the focus of your film work. Include what you want the audience take from your concept, your research methods, use of medium, choice of sound design and image and genre to illustrate your idea.

  • Title:
  • Name:
  • Format:
  • Genre:
  • Running time:
  • Program of Study:
  • Student Contact (GSU email):
  • Brief Abstract:

Instructions for Presenting your Film Work

The virtual film presentation session will include both synchronous and asynchronous components, with films available for viewing throughout the conference and filmmakers available to answer questions and engage with conference participants during a specific one-hour time period.

Each filmmaker should provide a link to view their film, a film statement, and a short video introducing the film. These materials should be uploaded to the conference site by Monday, April 12th so that conference attendees and judges can read the statement and view the film and accompanying introductory video in advance of the live session later in the week.

The live session will be a one-hour video conference session during which judges and conference participants will be able to drop in and ask the filmmaker more specific questions about their work. More detailed instructions and tutorials about how to upload the files and supplementary materials will be provided well in advance of the conference.